I just wanna see you be brave

tippystardust:

sixpenceee:

solunais:

sixpenceee:

Some followers suggested this to me.

The island known as the “island of madness”, “hell” and “the most haunted place on Earth” is being sold!

Here’s a quick, history behind it:

The plagued people were shipped off to Poveglia Island, a small, secluded land mass that floats between Venice and Lido. There, people lived out the last of their wretched lives together until they died.

Since the island already reeked of death, the next time an epidemic came along, barely alive bodies were dumped there and burned in mass graves.

In the 20s, a mental hospital was built to welcome the island’s newest “guests,” or anybody that showed symptoms of any sort of sickness, physical or mental.

Basically, if you had an itch, away you went to Poveglia where you’d sink your feet into the soil (half dirt, half human ash) and be in the company of over 100K diseased ghosts.

It didn’t help when the place was converted into a hospital for the mentally ill in 1922. Rumor has it, the hospital was home to a number of crude lobotomies, performed by a doctor who’d been driven mad by the ghosts. He later flung himself off the bell tower.

The Italian government is now offering a 99-year lease to whomever’s brave enough to take it over. The italian government thinks it would make a great hotel destination!

SOURCE

"Build a hotel" they said. "It will be fun" they said. 

The start of a real life shining everyone

WILL EVERYONE PLEASE JUST WATCH S03EP03 OF GHOST ADVENTURES BEFORE YOU EVEN CONSIDER BUYING IT

(via meggirl49)

wander-panzer:

patientlights:

anxiety is terrible, you could be having an attack and no one would even know because it’s an inward thing. it feels like you’re malfunctioning and you can’t process your own thoughts. you get a knot in your stomach and you can’t take a full breath but outwardly you can literally just sit there and look completely normal as long as no one tries to speak to you.

Yep that about sums it up

(via meggirl49)

joeyrichtersbottom:

aimmyarrowshigh:

I wish we said “fancy” in America. As in, “I fancy you.” It’s such a more agreeable term than “I have a crush on you.”  What’s a crush? Like, I AM A BOA CONSTRICTOR AND I AM GOING TO IMMOBILIZE YOU WITH MY MISPLACED AND OBSESSIVE AFFECTION.  “I fancy you” is like, you’re so shiny and glittery and I just want to put you on a shelf and look at you for a while ‘cause you’re fancy.

in australia we just exchange boomerangs 

(Source: aimmyarrowshigh, via meggirl49)

magical-tomato-chan:

friendly reminder that you don’t owe your mom kindness and love if she hasn’t shown you any, and that family members don’t automatically deserve all your respect if they treat you badly. don’t let anyone make you feel guilty about how your parents treat you.

(Source: robouji, via smoke-and-ink)

mossyelf:

phiife:

this eases the entire fuck out of my mind.

Goodnight

(Source: algoll, via couldntmakeitanymoreobvious)

badlupin:

there are some days where i forget to eat the entire day, and then there are other days where i have first breakfast, second breakfast, elevenses, luncheon, third breakfast, tea, dinner, soupsies, supper, night lunch, midnight snack and one-in-the-morning snack

(via couldntmakeitanymoreobvious)

“I have always wondered what hurts more, the pain of wondering or the pain of knowing the truth.”
— lucyflores2011 (via lucyflores2011)

(via jorclen)

“You took my heart and tore it in two
I don’t understand why
Because I never lied to you
I was always honest and open
Told you the truth when words were to be spoken
Why did you have to lie to me
You played games with something that isn’t a toy
It’s something real
It gives me feelings
Feelings that I had and still have for you
They won’t ever go away
They’re always going to linger and stay
You were a part of me
But you’ve left me oh so lonely
Broken and torn
Left behind in the dust and darkness
You took something golden
And chipped it away till it was worth nothing
Because I won’t ever be first
I’ll always come in second
I’ll never be your favorite
I’ll just be your regret
I was a stepping stool for you
Just so you could get the past back
Nothing more than a door mat
For you to walk all over
I hate you for what you’ve done to me
Yet I miss you so much that it literally hurts
Is this what they call love?
If so then I never want to feel it again.”
— Kls (via thereasonyouresmiling)

(via jorclen)

kanayahummel:

carojararo:

alice-in-hogwartsia:

master-meg:

songs-of-gallifrey:

becauseavengers:

godsofmischiefandthunder:

like good tequila 

image

or fine wine

image

some things

image

just 

image

get better

image

with 

image

age

image

 #this better fucking apply to me #i think i got uglier actually #am I cheese?

let’s not forget

image

these guys

image

too

image

mATT

mATT THOUGH

Why does Matt have a fucking dead squirrel in his head!?

image

(Source: thored, via mcflycriss)

willyciraptor:

zoewashburne:

drivedarlingdrive:

I’M SO SORRY FOR 14 YEAR OLD ME WHO HATED YOU YOU ARE AN ADORABLE PRINCESS AND I’M SORRY

(Source: dailystews, via ronandhermionesource)

sunfishdunes:

Dear Damian,
It’s been a long time since our last encounter. Ten years to be exact.
I was 26; you were 16. You were proud of who you were; I was an insecure actor. You became an iconic character that people looked up to; I wished I’d had you as a role model when I was younger. I might’ve been easier to be gay growing up.
You WERE beautiful in every single way and words couldn’t bring you down.
What you may not know …
When I was cast in the role of “Damian” in Mean Girls, I was TERRIFIED to play this part. But this was a natural and true representation of a gay teenager — a character we laughed with instead of at. (You can thank Tina Fey and Mark Waters for that. I can only take partial credit.)
When we first made this movie, I’m not sure any of us knew how loved and quoted this movie would become. You certainly hope when you pour your heart into something, that people will respond — but to paraphrase Gretchen Wieners, “we can’t help it that we’re so popular.”
So, why the hell did it take me so long to come out of the closet?
Here’s why:
When I first became an actor, I wanted to play lots of roles — Guidos, gangsters, and goombahs were my specialty. So, would I be able to play all of those parts after portraying a sensitive, moisturizing, Ashton Kutcher-loving, pink-shirt-wearing kid? I was optimistic. Hollywood? Not so much. I was meeting a “gay glass ceiling” in casting.
For example:
One time I wanted to audition for a supporting character in a low-budget indie movie described as a “doughy, blue-collar lug of a guy.” The role was to play the husband of an actress friend of mine who I had been in two movies and an Off-Broadway play with. She and I had even moved to LA together.
I figured I was perfect for it.
They said they were looking for a real “man’s man.” The casting director wouldn’t even let me audition. This wasn’t the last time this happened. There were industry people who had seen me play you in Mean Girls but never seen me read in an audition but still denied me to be seen for “masculine” roles.
However, I did turn down many offers to play flamboyant, feather-boa-slinging stereotypes that always seemed to be laughed at BECAUSE they were gay. How could I go from playing an inspirational, progressive gay youth to the embarrassing, cliched butt-of-a-joke?
So, there it was. Damian, you had ruined my life and I was really pissed at you. I became celibate for a year and a half. I didn’t go to any gay bars, have any flings and I lied to anyone who asked if I was gay. I even brought a girl to the Mean Girlspremiere and kissed her on the red carpet, making her my unwitting beard.
It wasn’t until years later that grown men started to coming up to me on the street — some of them in tears — and thanking me for being a role model to them. Telling me I gave them comfort not only being young and gay but also being a big dude. It was then that I realized how much of an impact YOU had made on them.
Meanwhile, I was still in the closet. Deleting tweets that asked if I was gay, scrubbing IMDB Message Boards for any indication, etc. (It’s important to note that I was actually DISCOVERED singing in a Florida gay bar by casting director, Carmen Cuba, for my first role in Larry Clark’s Bully.)
I had the perfect opportunity in 2004 to let people know the REAL Daniel Franzese. Now in 2014 — 10 years later — looking back, it took YOU to teach me how to be proud of myself again. It’s okay if no one wants to sit at the table with the “art freaks.” Being a queer artist is one of my favorite things about myself. I have always been different and that’s rad. People have always asked if I was really gay? While my reps usually lied to protect me. My friends and family all knew the truth but now it’s time everyone does. Perhaps this will help someone else. I had to remind myself that my parents named me Daniel because it means “God is my judge.” So, I’m not afraid anymore. Of Hollywood, the closet, or mean girls. Thank you for that, Damian. (And Tina.)
By the way … in June I am the Celebrity Grand Marshall of the Portland Gay Pride Parade.
so…
We go Glen Coco.
With love and respect,
Daniel Franzese
P.S. I hate it when people say I’m “too gay to function.” I know you do, too. Those people are part of the problem. They should refrain from using that phrase. It really is ONLY okay when Janis says it.

sunfishdunes:

Dear Damian,

It’s been a long time since our last encounter. Ten years to be exact.

I was 26; you were 16. You were proud of who you were; I was an insecure actor. You became an iconic character that people looked up to; I wished I’d had you as a role model when I was younger. I might’ve been easier to be gay growing up.

You WERE beautiful in every single way and words couldn’t bring you down.

What you may not know …

When I was cast in the role of “Damian” in Mean Girls, I was TERRIFIED to play this part. But this was a natural and true representation of a gay teenager — a character we laughed with instead of at. (You can thank Tina Fey and Mark Waters for that. I can only take partial credit.)

When we first made this movie, I’m not sure any of us knew how loved and quoted this movie would become. You certainly hope when you pour your heart into something, that people will respond — but to paraphrase Gretchen Wieners, “we can’t help it that we’re so popular.”

So, why the hell did it take me so long to come out of the closet?

Here’s why:

When I first became an actor, I wanted to play lots of roles — Guidos, gangsters, and goombahs were my specialty. So, would I be able to play all of those parts after portraying a sensitive, moisturizing, Ashton Kutcher-loving, pink-shirt-wearing kid? I was optimistic. Hollywood? Not so much. I was meeting a “gay glass ceiling” in casting.

For example:

One time I wanted to audition for a supporting character in a low-budget indie movie described as a “doughy, blue-collar lug of a guy.” The role was to play the husband of an actress friend of mine who I had been in two movies and an Off-Broadway play with. She and I had even moved to LA together.

I figured I was perfect for it.

They said they were looking for a real “man’s man.” The casting director wouldn’t even let me audition. This wasn’t the last time this happened. There were industry people who had seen me play you in Mean Girls but never seen me read in an audition but still denied me to be seen for “masculine” roles.

However, I did turn down many offers to play flamboyant, feather-boa-slinging stereotypes that always seemed to be laughed at BECAUSE they were gay. How could I go from playing an inspirational, progressive gay youth to the embarrassing, cliched butt-of-a-joke?

So, there it was. Damian, you had ruined my life and I was really pissed at you. I became celibate for a year and a half. I didn’t go to any gay bars, have any flings and I lied to anyone who asked if I was gay. I even brought a girl to the Mean Girlspremiere and kissed her on the red carpet, making her my unwitting beard.

It wasn’t until years later that grown men started to coming up to me on the street — some of them in tears — and thanking me for being a role model to them. Telling me I gave them comfort not only being young and gay but also being a big dude. It was then that I realized how much of an impact YOU had made on them.

Meanwhile, I was still in the closet. Deleting tweets that asked if I was gay, scrubbing IMDB Message Boards for any indication, etc. (It’s important to note that I was actually DISCOVERED singing in a Florida gay bar by casting director, Carmen Cuba, for my first role in Larry Clark’s Bully.)

I had the perfect opportunity in 2004 to let people know the REAL Daniel Franzese. Now in 2014 — 10 years later — looking back, it took YOU to teach me how to be proud of myself again. It’s okay if no one wants to sit at the table with the “art freaks.” Being a queer artist is one of my favorite things about myself. I have always been different and that’s rad. People have always asked if I was really gay? While my reps usually lied to protect me. My friends and family all knew the truth but now it’s time everyone does. Perhaps this will help someone else. I had to remind myself that my parents named me Daniel because it means “God is my judge.” So, I’m not afraid anymore. Of Hollywood, the closet, or mean girls. Thank you for that, Damian. (And Tina.)

By the way … in June I am the Celebrity Grand Marshall of the Portland Gay Pride Parade.

so…

We go Glen Coco.

With love and respect,

Daniel Franzese

P.S. I hate it when people say I’m “too gay to function.” I know you do, too. Those people are part of the problem. They should refrain from using that phrase. It really is ONLY okay when Janis says it.

(via myfairamy118)

accidently:

stevieknickers:

accidently:

im running for student council

I’d vote for you

thank you, citizen 

accidently:

stevieknickers:

accidently:

im running for student council

I’d vote for you

thank you, citizen 

(via myfairamy118)

housewifeswag:

earthserenity:

sean3116:

sixpenceee:

As someone who wants to study the human consciousness I found this very interesting.

Scott Routley was a “vegetable”. A car accident seriously injured both sides of his brain, and for 12 years, he was completely unresponsive.

Unable to speak or track people with his eyes, it seemed that Routley was unaware of his surroundings, and doctors assumed he was lost in limbo. They were wrong.

In 2012, Professor Adrian Owen decided to run tests on comatose patients like Scott Routley. Curious if some “vegetables” were actually conscious, Owen put Routley in an fMRI and told him to imagine walking through his home. Suddenly, the brain scan showed activity. Routley not only heard Owen, he was responding.

Next, the two worked out a code. Owen asked a series of “yes or no” questions, and if the answer was “yes,” Routley thought about walking around his house. If the answer was “no,” Routley thought about playing tennis.

These different actions showed activity different parts of the brain. Owen started off with easy questions like, “Is the sky blue?” However, they changed medical science when Owen asked, “Are you in pain?” and Routley answered, “No.” It was the first time a comatose patient with serious brain damage had let doctors know about his condition.

While Scott Routley is still trapped in his body, he finally has a way to reach out to the people around him. This finding has huge implications.

SOURCE

HOLY STEAMING SHITFUCKS

WHY IS EVERYONE NOT LOSING THEIR SHIT ABOUT THIS

ooohhhhhmmyyyyyyggggooooddddddd!!!!

holy fucking shit.

(via myfairamy118)